HAMMERS & PRY-BARS

A hammer is a tool that delivers a blow to an object. Most hammers are used to drive nails, fit parts, forge metal, and break apart objects, they are basic tools in many trades. The usual features are a head (most often made of steel) and a handle (also called a helve or haft). There are over 10 different variations of hammers, varying in shape, size, and structure, for different purposes, here are 6 basic types you can use around the shop and home;

1. STANDARD CLAW HAMMER

hammer

Claw hammers are used to drive nails and fit parts with the flat end, as well as break apart objects and pull nails with the claw end but generally, a claw hammer is associated with woodworking but is not limited to use with wood products. It is not suitable for heavy hammering on metal surfaces though, such as in machining work, as the steel of its head is somewhat brittle. It is really a weaker version of #2;

2. FRAMING/CARPENTER CLAW HAMMER

framing hammer

The framing hammer is an over-sized claw hammer used in framing carpentry. The larger and heavier head can decrease the number of blows required to fully insert nails. Framing hammers commonly have a “checkered” face, which reduces skip-off of the head if the blow is not precisely struck on the nail.  Framing hammers also have a much straighter claw than regular claw hammers, as the claw is designed more for prying nailed boards apart, rather than removing nails (though its claw can also be used in that capacity).

3. BALL-PEEN HAMMERS

ball_peen_hammer

Ball-peen hammers are good for striking punches and chisels (usually performed with the flat face of the hammer) and rounding off edges of metal pins and fasteners, such as rivets with the peening edge. They are more known as a machinist’s hammer and are more distinguished from other types such as cross-peen hammer, diagonal-peen hammer, point-peen hammer, or chisel-peen hammer by having a hemispherical head.

 

4. DEAD BLOW HAMMER

dead blow

Dead blow hammers typically have an internal cavity partially filled with steel, lead shot, or loose sand. This modification evens out the curve of the impact, enabling a more powerful blow to be delivered without risk to the target.

5. RUBBER MALLET

mallet

Mallets are usually made of rubber, wood or rawhide, but there are soft metal types like copper and brass as well. They are used when a softer blow is called for than that delivered by a standard metal hammer or even a dead blow, and since they do not leave marks and are less likely to dent the work-piece, they are handy to have around when working on cars when you need to fit parts together by force.

6. SLEDGEHAMMER

sledgehammer

Sledgehammers are great when absolute force is needed to drive an object into the ground or to dislodge something that is too big for a standard hammer.

 

STANDARD PRY-BARS

 pry bars

Pry-bars are heavy iron levers with one end forged into a wedge. Used to typically pry away parts (hence the name) but there are other variations like

JIM CROW-BAR

The Jim Crow is a crowbar slotted for pulling nails, others made for the same purpose are;

CAT-CLAW PRY-BAR

CAT CLAW

FLAT-BAR

FLAT BAR

 

 

 

 

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